Youth Justice, Police and NYC’s Neighborhoods

Center for New York City Affairs at The New School presents a Child Welfare Watch forum Co-sponsored by the New York Juvenile Justice Initiative There’s been a sea change in New York City juvenile justice policy and police practices over the last two years: Courts now place most teen delinquents in city programs close to home, […]

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Families, Stability and the Return from Prison

With incarceration rates in the U.S. still near an all-time high, the transition from prison back to the community is a remarkably common occurrence in low-income communities. In 2010, 700,000 men and women nationwide left prison, writes Harvard sociologist Bruce Western, “and incarceration rates for male high school dropouts under age 35 reached 12 percent for whites and 35 […]

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Income Inequality Associated with Child Maltreatment

According to a study in the upcoming March 2014 issue of Pediatrics, higher rates of child maltreatment are statistically correlated with higher levels of income inequality in counties across the United States. The study compared data on income inequality in more than 3,100 counties nationwide, and found a close association with rates of abuse and […]

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More on the intersection of child poverty and trauma

Documentation of the impact of poverty on children becomes ever deeper and more powerful: A recent study published by the Urban Institute found significant rates of school related problems, risky behavior and mental health problems for youths living in distressed public housing. In their report, they show the risk that children face when in poverty, […]

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LGBTQ Homeless Youth Undercount?

As January came to a close, city and state governments and volunteers nationwide set out to count the number of homeless people living on their streets. As Sarah Goodyear reports in Atlantic Cities, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning young people are likely underrepresented by a large margin in most of these local and national […]

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Supporting Child Welfare Caseworkers on the Job

Many new child welfare workers enter the field full of promise and the potential to help vulnerable children and families. But by the end of their first year, only 60 percent remain in the field, according to a story published in City Limits Magazine this week. Emotionally taxing situations, unpredictable schedules and heavy caseloads are just […]

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Child Welfare Watch News Digest – January 6, 2014

Here’s some of the latest public policy news on low-income children, youth and families: Last week, the Coalition for the Homeless released a policy brief that takes a critical look at former Mayor Bloomberg’s Advantage rent subsidy program, which ended in early 2011. The report finds that nearly half of families whose Advantage Program subsidies […]

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ChildSuccessNYC To Go Citywide

By Gianna Palmer New York City’s foster care system is getting revamped. Until now, foster care in New York City has operated using best practices guidelines—but few specific requirements—for everything from how to engage birth parents to staff qualifications. The result, foster care workers and child welfare experts say, is that the nonprofit organizations that […]

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New Report: Mentally ill adolescents in isolation on Rikers Island

The New York City Board of Correction released a report last week that documents the stories of three adolescents who were sentenced to more than 200 days in isolation on Rikers Island. Each of the teenagers, who were 17 and 18 years old when they were interviewed by the Board, had been diagnosed with a […]

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Watch Interviews from our Recent Event “Baby Steps: Poverty, Chronic Stress, and New York’s Youngest Children”

On October 4th, Child Welfare Watch hosted a forum on New York City’s youngest children. Our panel of experts discussed what babies and very small children need in order to grow healthy and strong–and the potentially devastating impacts of poverty and chronic stress on early childhood development. Dr. Jack Shonkoff, M.D., is the FAMRI Professor of Child Health […]

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