More Low-Level Arrests under de Blasio than Bloomberg

In the first seven months of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration, the NYPD made more arrests for petty crimes than it did last year under former mayor Michael Bloomberg—and the racial breakdown of those arrests remains the same, according to numbers released yesterday by the Police Reform Organizing Project (PROP). From January through July of 2014, police […]

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An Unequal Distribution of Child Care Vouchers

Each year, the city gives out thousands of vouchers to help low-income families pay for daycare and afterschool programs. In theory, these vouchers should be available to working families across the city. However, as of the beginning of 2014, nearly 50 percent of the city’s available low-income vouchers were used in just two Brooklyn neighborhoods—each […]

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New Report – Big Dreams for New York City’s Youngest Children: The future of early care and education

Big Dreams for New York City’s Youngest Children: The future of early care and education (PDF) In October 2012, New York City launched EarlyLearnNYC, a plan that would upend its system for providing subsidized child care to working class and low-income families. The goal was to take the city’s sprawling assortment of child care programs—ranging […]

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Recommendations & Solutions – Big Dreams for New York’s Youngest Children: The future of early care and education

RECOMMENDATIONS AND SOLUTIONS By establishing full-day, universal pre-kindergarten for New York City’s 4-year-olds, Mayor Bill de Blasio has demonstrated a powerful commitment to early childhood education. His administration now has the opportunity to broaden that vision and strengthen the city’s subsidized programs for early care and education serving the city’s youngest residents, children aged 0 […]

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Executive Summary & Findings – Big Dreams for New York’s Youngest Children: The future of early care and education

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In October 2012, New York City put a plan into action that would upend its system for providing subsidized child care to working class and low-income families. The Bloomberg administration set out to take the city’s large and unwieldy assortment of early care and education programs—ranging from subsidized babysitting services to nationally accredited […]

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Panel – Big Dreams for New York’s Youngest Children: The future of early care and education

Presented by the Center for New York City Affairs at The New School in collaboration with the Child Care and Early Education Fund With the creation of EarlyLearnNYC in 2012, New York City reinvented its system for subsidized early care and education for children from low-income families. Officials sought to ensure high quality, developmentally smart care–but […]

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Homes to Prevent Child Maltreatment

Families who experience homelessness are more likely to have their children placed in foster care than other low-income families, reports City Limits in a profile about a new housing program. Run by the Corporation for Supportive Housing, Keeping Families Together (KFT) is one of the country’s first supportive housing programs created with the explicit mission […]

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Youth Justice, Police and NYC’s Neighborhoods

Center for New York City Affairs at The New School presents a Child Welfare Watch forum Co-sponsored by the New York Juvenile Justice Initiative There’s been a sea change in New York City juvenile justice policy and police practices over the last two years: Courts now place most teen delinquents in city programs close to home, […]

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Families, Stability and the Return from Prison

With incarceration rates in the U.S. still near an all-time high, the transition from prison back to the community is a remarkably common occurrence in low-income communities. In 2010, 700,000 men and women nationwide left prison, writes Harvard sociologist Bruce Western, “and incarceration rates for male high school dropouts under age 35 reached 12 percent for whites and 35 […]

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Income Inequality Associated with Child Maltreatment

According to a study in the upcoming March 2014 issue of Pediatrics, higher rates of child maltreatment are statistically correlated with higher levels of income inequality in counties across the United States. The study compared data on income inequality in more than 3,100 counties nationwide, and found a close association with rates of abuse and […]

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