Date | February, 2017

Event – Space and the Making of Race-Capitalism

Mia White, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science, The New School This lecture erects three conceptual pillars: institutions – history – space.  “Institution” is understood broadly as any structure or mechanism of social order governing the behavior of individuals while also transcending individual lives and intention.  In this regard, we may call “race” an institution.   “History” […]

Read more No Comments

Event – Genres of Speculation

Genres of Speculation opens a discussion concerning the modes of fantasy and forecast that lie at the heart of racialized economies of enjoyment and terror while also attending to the forms of imagination and tabulation that strain against these structuring relays of desire, knowledge and violence. How have enduring matrices of antiblack violence prefigured the […]

Read more No Comments

Public Seminar: Who’s Afraid of Workplace Democracy?

Katarina Spasic analyses recent research that indicates cooperatives manage resources just as efficiently For a year, from 1934-35, Simone Weil, the French philosopher and activist, worked at a factory as a manual laborer to deepen her understanding of the working class. In the aftermath of this experience, she wrote in her biography, “That contact with […]

Read more No Comments

Event – Bonded: Migrant Workers, Global Capitalism, and the Return of Un-Freedom

Public lecture by Natasha Iskander – Associate Professor of Public Policy, Wagner School, New York University   In modern capitalist production systems around the world, forced labor arrangements are used in specific and deliberate ways to meet production challenges. In contemporary Qatar, forced labor arrangements erase the skill contribution of workers — an aspect of production […]

Read more No Comments

Event – Public Choice Theory: The Billionaires’ Bid to Undermine Democracy

Public lecture by Nancy MacLean – Professor of History, Duke University Today’s plutocracy is the product of decades of right-wing activism that not only changed who rules, but also the fundamental rules of democratic governance. Billionaires did not launch this project; a white economist in the embattled Jim Crow South did.   But when Nobel-Prize winning economist […]

Read more No Comments

Event – Whiteness as Property, Choice, and Citizenship: Raced Rights and Inequality in Public Education under Neoliberalism

Public lecture by Ujju Aggarwal – Postdoctoral Fellow, National Academy of Education, Spencer Foundation May 8, 6pm Wolff Conference Room, 6 E 16th St Room 1103   Since Brown v. Board of Education, public education has been both the most universally accessible and yet also the most unequal institution in the United States. Public education […]

Read more No Comments

Event – Black Capitalism

Public lecture by Nathan Connolly – Associate Professor of History, Johns Hopkins University The Civil Property Rights Movement This talk highlights the persistence of economic arguments within black movements, both from the perspective of the labor-left – the typical protagonists in civil rights “origins” stories – and from the point of view of black entrepreneurs and professionals, who […]

Read more No Comments

Event – Neoliberalism and the Paradox of Persistent Racial Disparity

Public Lecture by Darrick Hamilton – Associate Professor of Economics and Urban Policy, Milano and the New School for Social Research Black Americans with high levels of educational attainment still, paradoxically, exhibit large disparities in economic and health outcomes. The post-racial politics of personal responsibility and tropes of ‘neoliberal paternalism’ discourage public responsibility for the […]

Read more No Comments

Event – Enslavement to Precarity? African Labor History

Public Lecture by Fred Cooper – Professor of History, New York University How does one write about Africa in the context of capitalism and colonization without reducing Africa to the victim of historical processes determined elsewhere? This talk will chart scholarly perspectives and sketch some of the multiple ways in which the history of capitalism […]

Read more No Comments

Event – The Plantation Complex and the Force Economy: Liberalism and the Racial Mode of Production, 1830-1900

Public Lecture by Kris Manjapra – Associate Professor of History and Interim Director, Consortium of Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora, Tufts University During the so-called Age of Liberalism (1830-1900), forced labor spread across the globe.   Amidst discourses of abolition, the monumental migration of ‘indentured’ laborers from Asia to the West Indies was matched […]

Read more No Comments