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Standing out from the crowd at conferences

A blog associated with the Chronicle of Higher Education called Vitae, offers career advice and tips for academics. A recent post offers six quick tips about using conferences as an opportunity to mark your mark as a scholar. Some advice is a gimme–who is wearing jeans to these events?–but other advice and links are less obvious. […]

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Advice for grad students from the blogosphere

Besides this blog, what blogs or online sources do you follow for advice pertaining to your graduate studies? Occasionally, GRADFACts will re-post articles from The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Ed, and other new sources that might interest NSSR students and faculty. But what have you come across that’s helpful? A friend recently recommended a blog […]

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The university’s role in debt-financed growth

A recent article in the Dissent discusses the ballooning costs of American colleges and universities. It examines the way that such institutions, although essentially non-profit institutions, are able to generate profits indirectly for others: namely, banks via student loans and real-estate developers. The article details exactly why this might be worrisome. Read more at Dissent.

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ABD and on the market

Inside Higher Ed published an essay about going on the job market while ABD (all but dissertation). Although it’s from the perspective of an English literature PhD, there are some points certainly relevant to all job-seeking academics. For instance, the author includes a checklist and a section on work you do before you even consider entering the market. A […]

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Free university project annoucement

From the The Free University of NYC: Dear Free University participants and friends, We are writing to invite you to participate in another exciting Free University project from September 18th-22nd. Last spring’s May Day Free U was a huge success, primarily because of the collaborative energy that was brought to the space by folks from […]

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On the job market and trans

Depending on your field, academic jobs are either difficult or very difficult to come by. This article from The Chronicle of Higher Education describes what it’s like to be transgender academic on the market. The author details the challenges faced by having publications under multiple names, and other aspects of academic applications that may out trans applicants […]

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Inventions earn almost $2-billion for universities last year

The Chronicle of Higher Education reports on the earnings that more than 157 universities received for their inventions and patents. Since we’re attending a university driven mainly by tuition, this article illustrates an interesting, and more common alternative to our attitudes toward university fiscal policy. It is but one of the many ways we are unique […]

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The relationship between banks and universities

A recent article in The New York Times examines the changing relationship between banks and universities. Regulators have recently outlawed certain practices (e.g., universities used to receive benefits for directing students to borrow from certain banks). But how have banks changed their strategy to attract students? The author points out a few questions that suggest […]

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What does the cost of college have in common with airplane tickets?

This article from the Chronicle of Higher Education compares the costs of college to airplane tickets, since in both cases different people will pay different amounts for their seat. They include some interesting data and research. Read the full article here.    

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Classrooms of the future

In order to imagine what classrooms in the future should look like–will they be neatly organized rows of desk attentive to a centralized authority figure?–we’ll have to ask ourselves what we think about education. Read more, and hear what intellectual figures such as Amy Gutmann have to say, by clicking here.

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