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Heidegger’s Concept of “Authentic Historical Science,” by Dimitri Ginev

Dimitri Ginev draws attention to an aspect of Heidegger’s philosophical project that has been strangely neglected by previous studies—the attempt to outline an authentic approach to historical inquiry and to historiographical methods; guided not by a taken-for-granted epistemology but by a self-critical awareness of the hermeneutical structure of history itself. The paper suggests that to […]

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It’s for the Kids: The Sociological Significance of W.E.B. Du Bois’ The Brownies’ Books and Their Philosophical Relevance for our Understanding of Gender in the Ethnological Age, by Tommy J. Curry

To date, there is not one scholarly essay exploring W.E.B. Du Bois’ publication of The Brownies’ Books. Our current understandings of gender, specifically Black masculinity, occlude our ability to see, much less understand, Black males as mothers or caregivers. Largely determined by our present caricatures of Black males, Black men were not thought to develop […]

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Kant and the Project of the Metaphysics of Enlightenment, by Axel Hutter

In his essay, Hutter discusses the concept of enlightenment and its relationship to metaphysics, arguing against a simple opposition between the two terms. Hutter contends that the critique of traditional metaphysics identified with the concept of enlightenment dialectically involves an undogmatic metaphysics of enlightenment, a discovery he attributes to Kant. The paper exposes the dialectics […]

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On Thinking the Real with Duns Scotus, by Richard A. Lee, Jr.

Lee reflects on the fact that many thinkers throughout the history of philosophy use Duns Scotus’ thought, and specifically readings of his conception of the real, in order to construct their theories. Lee focuses on the works of Marx, Pierce, and Deleuze to show the breadth of influence that Scotus’ work has in giving thinkers […]

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Plato and the German Romantic Thinkers: Friedrich Schlegel and Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher, by Marie-Dominique Richard

The aim of this article is to demonstrate how the Romantic thinkers F. Schlegel and F. Schleiermacher, in their interpretation of Plato, were tributaries of their philosophical a priori — premises that led them to elaborate their theory of the dialogic form, a theory that involves engaging the very definition of philosophy, and which prevails […]

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Violent Female Bodies: Questioning Thanatopolitics, by Adriana Cavarero

Among the various expressions of contemporary violence targeting helpless people unilaterally and at random, the phenomenon of women suicide bombers looks particularly uncanny. Characterized as it is by a “semantic excess,” the issue of female bodies imagined as bearers of life who turn into bearers of death seems to resist conceptualization, even conceptualization performed by […]

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Democratic Bodies, Biopolitically Correct, by Simona Forti

In “Democratic Bodies, Biopolitically Correct,” Simona Forti puts forth and responds to the contention that now, more than ever, the private/public distinction no longer holds. Forti argues that the progressive democratization of visibility, is concomitant with the inclusion of questions that were once thought to pertain to the most private and intimate spheres as topics […]

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Living the Biopolitical: Body and Resistance in Foucault and Merleau-Ponty, by Todd May

French philosophy often seems to operate by constantly moving forward and away from the current generation of its writers. This paper argues that, at least in one instance, this way of proceeding would be a mistake. Michel Foucault’s analysis of power, since it applies to the body, is well complemented by Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s corporeal analysis. […]

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Rethinking the Biopolitical Turn: From the Thanatopolitical to the Geneapolitical Paradigm, by Chiara Bottici

Bottici rethinks the significance of the notion of “biopolitics” by placing it within the more general genealogy of “politics” and analyzing the philosophical implications of its emergence and proliferation: why has “biopolitics” emerged at a certain point in time and why did it emerge in that specific way? After briefly reconstructing two major breaks in […]

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Review Essay — Problematize and Reconstruct: Foucault, Genealogy, and Critique, by Sarin Marchetti

Sarin Marchetti reviews Colin Koopman’s Genealogy as Critique: Foucault and the Problems of Modernity, published by Indiana University Press (2013). Marchetti engages Koopman’s text by focusing on its methodological and metaphilosophical stakes, in particular on Koopman’s reading of Foucault’s genealogy as an activity of critique aimed at the problematization (rather than at either the vindication […]

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