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The Event of Finitude, by Renaud Barbaras

In this translated essay, Barbaras attempts to show how a phenomenological account of the subject in terms of its intentional relation to the world—in other words, an account of the correlation between subject and transcendent being—will and must, when adequately pursued, be “surpassed” by metaphysics. Beginning with the question of how the subject can simultaneously […]

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A Micro-Intertextual Approach to Ancient Thought: The Case of the Torpedo Fish from Plato to Galen, by Valérie Cordonier

The torpedo fish (also known as the electric ray, or crampfish) is known for causing numbness to the hands of fishermen when captured in their nets. This essay reconstructs a line of discussions concerning the nature of this fish’s numbing power through a long period pre-dating our contemporary notion of electricity. By following selected mentions […]

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Political Philosophy in the Era of Climate Change: Between Eco-Cosmopolitanism and the Green State, by Johanna Oksala

Oksala argues that climate change is primarily a political problem, and that the resources of political philosophy are essential for both diagnostic and strategic responses to it. After critically assessing approaches that advocate an eco-cosmopolitanism and those that rely on “green” states, she charges that both fail to account for the systemic problems that underpin […]

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Significant Formation: An Intersubjective Approach to Aesthetic Experience in Cassirer and Langer, by Anne Pollok

In Ernst Cassirer’s late writings, art is understood as a language that forms its subject matter not to convey an understanding of the world, but to create “a manifestation of inner life” (Essay on Man, p. 169). And even though its boundaries are within the subject (“inner”), such a manifestation rests on a social act, […]

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Adorno and Negative Theology, by Martin Shuster

This article elaborates Theodor W. Adorno’s understanding of “negation” and “negative theology.” It proceeds by introducing a typology of negation within modern philosophy roughly from Descartes onwards, showing how Adorno both fits and also stands out in this typology. Ultimately, it is argued that Adorno’s approach to negation and thereby to negative theology is throughout […]

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The Birth of Ἦθος out of Πάθος Paths of Responsive Phenomenology, by Bernhard Waldenfels

This essay argues for an ethics based on the classical understanding of the relationship of ethos to pathos and discusses the erosion of the passive and emotional components of pathos in modern approaches to ethical or moral claims. Waldenfels outlines a series of missteps of ethical and moral approaches to the creation of the good […]

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The Ethical Priority of the Extra-Ordinary: An Interview with Bernhard Waldenfels, by Irina Rotaru

This interview was conducted in April 2010, in Munich. The questions were intended to touch upon the central ideas in Bernhard Waldenfels’ thought, as well as to highlight what he considers to be the purpose of philosophy. Waldenfels explains why the ideal of an all-encompassing order is overly optimistic, and perhaps even violent. He also […]

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Response to Eric Schliesser’s Review of Kant’s Critique of Spinoza, by Omri Boehm

Omri Boehm responds to Eric Schliesser’s review of his book, Kant’s Critique of Spinoza, published in a previous issue of the Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal. Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Omri Boehm is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at The New School for Social Research. He is the author of Kant’s Critique of Spinoza […]

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REVIEW—Áine Mahon’s The Ironist and the Romantic: Reading Richard Rorty and Stanley Cavell

Alexander Altonji reviews Áine Mahon’s The Ironist and the Romantic: Reading Richard Rorty and Stanley Cavell, published by Bloomsbury (2014). Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Alexander Altonji, review of The Ironist and the Romantic: Reading Richard Rorty and Stanley Cavell, by Áine Mahon, Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 37:1 (2016), pp. 187–91.

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REVIEW—J.M. Bernstein’s Torture and Dignity: An Essay on Moral Injury

Jeremy Gauger reviews J.M. Bernstein’s Torture and Dignity: An Essay on Moral Injury, published by University of Chicago Press (2015). Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Jeremy Gauger, review of Torture and Dignity: An Essay on Moral Injury, by J.M. Bernstein, Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 37:1 (2016), pp. 191–4.

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