Sheila C. Johnson Design Center Kicks Off Summer Season of Programs

Detail of Egas mural, which will be unveiled in the galleries later this month. Photographer: Daniela Merino

The academic year may be winding down, but a summer season of exhibitions has just begun at the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center (SJDC), featuring next-generation design talent and highlights from the New School Art Collection.

In the Kellen Gallery, (re)collection examines the daily lives of art objects and the role of institutional art collections in the 21st century through an exploration of the New School Art Collection, established in 1960 with support from the Albert A. List Foundation. Now grown to approximately 1,800 postwar and contemporary works of art, the collection features media and works by some of the most innovative and creative artists of our time. Installed throughout the campus, the collection offers students, faculty, and staff a rare opportunity to engage with art on a daily basis.

Works in the exhibition reflect The New School’s commitment to art as a vehicle for sociopolitical change and the university’s role as a center for innovative thinking and artistic experimentation. The exhibition presents newly acquired works, such as Trevor Paglen’s The Fence (Kickapoo, Texas) (2010), which visually captures the electromagnetic border that surrounds the United States, and rarely seen works, such as Roxy Paine’s 1995 conceptual piece Plug-in Painting. Also on view is the newly restored Camilo Egas mural Harvest Festival, Ecuador (1932), commissioned for the entrance to The New School’s Martha Graham Studio, located on the lower level of its historic Joseph Urban-designed building on West 12th Street.

In the Aronson Galleries of the SJDC, the center has partnered with the Architectural League of New York to present It’s Different, an exhibition of work by the winners of the 30th Annual Architectural League Prize for Young Architects and Designers (formerly the Young Architects Forum). Open to designers ten years or less out of school, the competition draws entrants from throughout North America. Prizewinners are also showcased in a lecture series at the SJDC and a catalog to be published by Princeton Architectural Press.

It’s Different opens with a lecture by prize recipients Jason Kelly Johnson and Nataly Gattegno of Future Cities Lab, San Francisco; Kiel Moe, Boston; and Catie Newell of Alibi Studio, Detroit, this Wednesday, June 15 at 7:00 p.m. An opening reception for (re)collection will be held this Thursday, June 16, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.

For more information, visit the SJDC website, www.newschool.edu/sjdc.