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Presents

International Sándor Ferenczi Network Weekend Webinars

Listening with Ferenczi

A Six Session Webinar Series

Weekends in 2021:
September 25 & 26
November 6 & 7
December 4 & 5

12:00 PM – 2:00 PM Eastern
Online via Zoom

Purchase tickets HERE

General Admission for all six sessions: $25
General Admission + CE credits (12 hours): $200
Current NSSR/NYU Postdoc students: Free (email NSSRFerencziCenter@gmail.com with your student N# to reserve a spot; limited number of seats available)

CE Credits (12 hours) available for
New York Social Workers and MHCs
APA CE credits available for Psychologists

**NOTE FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS: The New School for Social Research Clinical Psychology Department is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Please confirm with your state licensing board that APA CE credits are accepted in your state. (Approval from the New York State Board of Education to provide CE credits to licensed Psychologists in New York is pending.)

For students and practitioners of all levels 

After the successful 13th International Sándor Ferenczi Conference in Florence, Italy, the ISFN had planned to host the next International Ferenczi Conference in São Paulo, Brazil, in May of 2021. However, when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, our plans for in-person meetings had to be postponed. Despite these challenges, our desire to bring clinicians, scholars, researchers, students and colleagues together for stimulating and interdisciplinary discussions had not diminished. As a result, the ISFN decided to develop and offer a new 2021 Webinar series that will make use of Ferenczi’s work to examine the many social, personal, political, environmental and clinical disruptions we have all had to endure recently.
 
Ferenczi, more so than Freud, was interested in understanding how environmental stimuli impacted the self and, conversely, how aspects of the self could be projected onto the external environment. He perceived the developing self as being influenced by the dynamic interaction of introjective and projective processes, and he saw how one’s projections could also influence one’s external environment. More broadly, Ferenczi’s vision of this mutual influence could be applied to societal events in the sense that these events are able to influence self development, and in turn, an individual can also influence society. Today we are facing many of the same challenges that our psychoanalytic forebears faced over a century ago: war, pandemic, authoritarianism, racism, sexism, abuse, and conspiracies of silence and oppression. Ferenczi has provided us with many tools to explore the dynamic forces that affect our psyches, our society, and our culture. Perhaps applying his principles to our analysis of these crises may lead us to a more enlightened navigation of the inevitable catastrophes confronting our species.
 
This new Webinar series will explore such contemporary issues as the authoritarian personality, the phenomenon of authoritarian leaders and mass hypnosis, the collusion of silence and socio-political denial, how a pandemic impacts clinical work, trauma theory in traumatic times, and gender theory during the #MeToo movement.

* * * 

SEPTEMBER 25TH & 26TH
Session 1: The Leader’s Hypnotic Influence and the Creation of an Alternate Reality

Presenters: Endre Koritar, MD and Robert Prince, PhD, ABPP
Moderator: Ian Miller, PhD
Session 2: Leaning Towards Authoritarianism
Presenters: Jay Frankel, PhD and Samir Gandesha, PhD
Moderator: Christopher Fortune, EdD

NOVEMBER 6TH & 7TH
Session 3: Gender Matters/Thalassa
Presenters: Adrienne Harris, PhD and Jô Gondar, PhD
Moderator: Aleksandra Wagner, PhD
Session 4: Disavowal, Confusion of Tongues and Social-Political Denial
Presenters: Daniel Kupermann, PhD and Raluca Soreanu, PhD
Moderator: Clara Mucci, PhD

DECEMBER 4TH & 5TH
Session 5: Theories for Traumatic Times
Presenters: Eugênio Canesin Dal Molin, PhD and Judit Mészáros, PhD
Moderator: Antal Bókay, PhD
Session 6: Elasticity Today
Presenters: Judit Szekacs, PhD and Giselle Galdi, PhD
Moderator: Kathleen Kelley Lainé, MA
 

* * * 

For more information, including descriptions for each webinar and presenter bios, visit ferencziconference.com


Learning Objectives

At the end of each webinar, participants will be able to:

Session 1
1. Understand the underlying dynamics of Donald Trump’s influence on the populace.
2. Discuss what techniques Trump uses in his hypnotic suggestions to the populace.

Session 2
1. Describe the dynamics through which particular social traumas foster the development of authoritarian movements.
2. Elaborate on the narcissistic structure of authoritarian movements.

Session 3
1. Describe and analyze the creative contributions of Ferenczi to better understand sexuality and development.
2. Compare and contrast models of sexuality and gender in which biology, social phenomena, and developmental process may all contribute to developmental outcomes.

Session 4
1. Understand the relational, social and political dimension of the Ferenczian theory of trauma.
2. Recognize the potential of Ferenczian thought to understand contemporary forms of social  bonds.

Session 5
1. Discuss and compare the main characteristics of different trauma theories in psychoanalysis and related fields of knowledge.
2. Discuss how acceptance of reality and living with uncertainty are central to understand a traumatic situation.
3. Differentiate between challenging situations and trauma.

Session 6
1. Identify key aspects of the Ferenczian method of “elasticity.”  
2. Discuss effective uses of telepsychology.



Participants who wish to receive CE credits must attend the event (each seminar meeting) in its entirety; attendance will be recorded to track each participant’s entry and exit time.

Participants with physical or sensory disabilities are encouraged to contact the CE committee members at least 2 weeks in advance of the event to plan for appropriate accommodations. Please contact us via phone or email:
Nichelle Horlacher (Department Secretary) T 212.229.5727 x3223
aller454@newschool.edu (Richelle Allen, Ph.D.)
SteeleM@newschool.edu (Miriam Steele, Ph.D.)
LittL@newschool.edu (Lisa Litt, Ph.D.)

Participants may also contact CE committee members with any concerns. You may also share concerns when you receive your evaluation form after the event.

Tickets may be refunded up to 24 hours prior to the start of the event. Please email NSSRFerencziCenter@gmail.com to cancel your ticket and request a refund.

The New School for Social Research Clinical Psychology Department is approved by the American Psychological Association, the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work, and the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners to sponsor continuing education for psychologists, licensed social workers, and licensed mental health counselors, respectively. The New School for Social Research Clinical Psychology Department maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

The Sponsors of this event report no conflicts of interest or commercial support.


Presents

Steps toward an embodied psychoanalysis and psychotherapy

Narrative and Memory: Toward an Embodied Vision of Transference

Saturday, December 11, 2021

10:00 a.m.  –  3:00 p.m. Eastern
Online via Zoom

Tickets available HERE

General Admission: $50
CE credit add-on: $25
Students: $25
New School/NYU Postdoc students: Free (email NSSRFerencziCenter@gmail.com with your student N# to reserve a spot; limited number of seats available)

CE Credits (4 hours) available for
New York Social Workers and MHCs
APA CE credits available for Psychologists

**NOTE FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS: The New School for Social Research Clinical Psychology Department is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Please confirm with your state licensing board that APA CE credits are accepted in your state. (Approval from the New York State Board of Education to provide CE credits to licensed Psychologists in New York is pending.)

For students and practitioners of all levels 

Presenters:
Jon Sletvold, Psy.D. 
Doris Brothers, Ph.D.

Miriam Steele, Ph.D.

Moderator:
Adrienne Harris, Ph.D.

In our workshop last year, we focused on dissociation which often involves the forgetting of traumatic experiences. This year our focus is on remembering. In our view, mind, from birth on, involves the creation of narratives, both verbal and nonverbal, that are based on embodied memories. We believe that even when narratives are conveyed without words, they are never created and possessed by one person but reflect the interweaving of the familial, cultural, historical, and political situations of all involved. Stories of race, class, ethnicity, gender and sexuality are all interwoven into the narratives that organize our lives.

Ever since Freud’s earliest efforts to develop his theory of transference, memory has played a key role. In this workshop we will try to show how narratives, and the embodied non-verbal memories on which they are based, contribute to a new understanding of transference. When viewed from the perspective of the ever-changing embodied memories of both patient and therapist, transference is seen as a shifting flow of I, you, we and world. We propose that transferences often become rigidified in the context of trauma. Clinical material as well as exercises that illustrate the ubiquity of memory will be offered. We will conclude with embodied supervision focusing on the interplay of therapist’s and patient’s memories.

As we have done in previous workshops, experiential exercises and embodied supervision will be offered.

Adrienne Harris will again be the moderator.

Program

10:00 – 10:15   Introduction by Adrienne Harris

10:15 – 10:30   Opening Exercises: Participants will sit comfortably in their places as they scan the surround. They will then be asked to pay attention to any memories that occur to them. They then will be invited to comment on what aspects of themselves or the group or the surroundings seem to have stimulated their memories.   

10:30 – 11:15   Paper presentation by Doris Brothers and Jon Sletvold on narrative, memory and transference followed by Q & A

11:15 – 11:30   Break

11:30 – 12:15   Paper presentation by Miriam Steele followed by Q & A

12:15 – 1:00   Lunch

1:00 – 1:45   Discussion among presenters and participants led by Adrienne Harris

1:45 – 2:45   Embodied Supervision focusing on narrative and memory

2:45 – 3:00   Closing Exercise. Participants are asked to become aware of any thoughts and feelings that they may have at the close of this workshop.




– – – – –

Learning Objectives
At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

1. Discuss and explain the role of memory in transference from Freud´s earliest formulations
2. Describe and demonstrate how narratives are based on embodied memories
3. Explain and analyze how transference is formed by rigidified traumatic memories
4. Describe and identify the role of memories in embodied supervision



**********

Jon Sletvold, Psy.D. is faculty, training and supervising analyst at the Norwegian Character Analytic Institute. He teaches embodied perspectives on psychoanalysis and psychotherapy in Europa, USA and China. He has written articles and book chapters on embodiment in psychoanalytic theory, practice and training. He is the author of The Embodied Analyst: From Freud and Reich to Relationality, Relational Perspectives Book Series, 2014, winner of the Gradiva Award, 2015.

Doris Brothers, Ph.D. is a co-founder and faculty member of the Training and Research in Intersubjective Self Psychology Foundation (TRISP). She co-edited Psychoanalysis, Self and Context with Roger Frie from 2015 to 2019. She serves on the advisory board and council of IAPSP. She is the author of three books and many journal articles. Her latest book, Toward a Psychology of Uncertainty: Trauma-Centered Psychoanalysis was published by Analytic Press in 2008. She has presented workshops on embodiment with Jon Sletvold in New York, Beijing, Shanghai, Dublin and Vienna. She is in private practice in Manhattan, New York, USA.

Miriam Steele, Ph.D. is Professor of Psychology, at the New School for Social Research where she co-directs (with Dr. H. Steele) the Center for Attachment Research. Dr. Miriam Steele is also an Anna Freud Center trained psychoanalyst. Miriam initiated the London Parent-Child Project, a major longitudinal study of intergenerational patterns of attachment whose outcomes included the development of the Reflective Functioning concept and manual. Dr. M. Steele has also carried out longitudinal attachment research in the context of child maltreatment and adoption. Miriam, with Anne Murphy and Howard Steele, has pioneered the development and delivery of the Group Attachment-Based Intervention (GABI) aimed at preventing child maltreatment, and promoting secure child-parent attachments. Dr. Steele is among the 2017 Bowlby-Ainsworth Awardees so recognized by the Center for Mental Health Promotion. She is co-editor of the 2008 book, Clinical Applications of the Adult Attachment Interview, and the 2018 Handbook of Attachment-Based Interventions, both published by the Guilford Press, New York. Dr. Steele is a member of the Adult Attachment Interview Trainers’ Consortium.

Adrienne Harris, Ph.D. is Faculty and Supervisor at New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis. She is on the faculty and is a supervisor at the Psychoanalytic Institute of Northern California. She is an Editor at Psychoanalytic Dialogues, and Studies In Gender and Sexuality. In 2009, she, Lewis Aron, and Jeremy Safran established the Sándor Ferenczi Center at the New School University. She, Eyal Rozmarin and Steven Kuchuck co-edit the Book Series Relational Perspectives in Psychoanalysis. She is an editor of the IPA ejournal psychoanalysis.today.


Participants who wish to receive CE credits must attend the event (each seminar meeting) in its entirety; attendance will be recorded to track each participant’s entry and exit time.

Participants with physical or sensory disabilities are encouraged to contact the CE committee members at least 2 weeks in advance of the event to plan for appropriate accommodations. Please contact us via phone or email:
Nichelle Horlacher (Department Secretary) T 212.229.5727 x3223
aller454@newschool.edu (Richelle Allen, Ph.D.)
SteeleM@newschool.edu (Miriam Steele, Ph.D.)
LittL@newschool.edu (Lisa Litt, Ph.D.)

Participants may also contact CE committee members with any concerns. You may also share concerns when you receive your evaluation form after the event.

Tickets may be refunded up to 24 hours prior to the start of the event. Please email NSSRFerencziCenter@gmail.com to cancel your ticket and request a refund.

The New School for Social Research Clinical Psychology Department is approved by the American Psychological Association, the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work, and the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners to sponsor continuing education for psychologists, licensed social workers, and licensed mental health counselors, respectively. The New School for Social Research Clinical Psychology Department maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

The Sponsors of this event report no conflicts of interest or commercial support.


We are delighted to officially announce that registration is open for the inaugural conference
Laplanche in the States: the Sexual and the Cultural

Sándor Ferenczi Center co-director Adrienne Harris will be presenting

To register please go to the website www.laplancheinthestates.com


Presents

Working Across the Racial Divide: A Workshop for Mental Health Providers

with Warren E. Spielberg, Ph.D.,
Kirkland C. Vaughans, Ph.D.,
and Kimberlyn Leary, Ph.D., MPA




Saturday, February 26, 2022
11:00 AM – 3:30 PM (with a 30 minute break)

Online via Zoom

Purchase tickets HERE

Professionals: $100
Young professionals: $60
CE credit add-on: $25
Students: $30
NSSR & NYU Postdoc students: Free 
(email NSSRFerencziCenter@gmail.com with your student N# to reserve a spot; limited number of seats available)

CE Credits (4 hours) available for
New York Social Workers and MHCs
APA CE credits available for Psychologists

**NOTE FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS: The New School for Social Research Clinical Psychology Department is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Please confirm with your state licensing board that APA CE credits are accepted in your state. (Approval from the New York State Board of Education to provide CE credits to licensed Psychologists in New York is pending.)

For students and practitioners of all levels 

The purpose of this workshop is to help clinicians expand their capacity to work across racial, cultural and ethnic divides in order to enhance their effectiveness in the delivery of mental health services. In this workshop we will discuss how we approach working with individuals from different racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds in cross racial dyads. We will also explore the challenges of working in diverse groups in various organizational formats. Through the use of exercises, didactic material, role play and case presentation the facilitators along with the workshop participants will develop a “mental space” for further intrapsychic, interpersonal and institutional exploration in the following locations.

The workshop will focus on:
1) Understanding Racial Trauma
2) Transference and Countertransference issues in working with diversity
3) Understanding the nature of transgenerational trauma in treatment
4) Understanding Racial Enactments
5) Understanding the impediments of people of color in attaining treatment.

Learning Objectives
At the end of the seminar:

  1. Participants will be able to examine, appreciate, and discuss the examined the anxieties pertaining to their own racial identity.
  2. Participants will be able to analyze and discuss racism from an individual, and institutional perspective.
  3. Participants will be able to identify and assess the inevitability of the racialized transference/countertransference matrix in a mixed racial therapy dyad.
  4. Participants will be able to recite and explain vital information pertaining to the health, mental health of adults and children of color.
  5. Participants will be able to discuss and assess the intergenerational transmission of trauma in the African American community and how this issue surfaces in treatment.

Warren Spielberg, Ph.D., is a psychologist, psychoanalyst, Fulbright Scholar, and an Associate Teaching Professor at the New School for Public Engagement. He is Co-Author of  “The Psychology of Black Boys and Adolescents- Two Volumes”, Praeger 2015. He is an acknowledged authority on the problems of boys and men and is a member of the American Psychological (APA) Task Force on treatment guidelines for boys and men. He is also the recipient of  a Practitioner of the Year Citation by the APA for his work with the FDNY post 9/11. He maintains a private practice in Brooklyn Heights, where he works with children, families and adults. Dr. Spielberg consults on issues relating to boys and men worldwide to such organizations as UNICEF, FDNY and the NYC Mayor’s Young Men’s Initiative.

Kirkland C. Vaughans, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist and Fellow (training and supervising Analyst) of the Institute for Psychoanalytic Training and Research {IPTAR}, Adjunct Professor in both the NYU Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis and the Mitchell Center as well as Clinical Director of the Derner/Hempstead Child Clinic and Senior Adjunct Professor at the Derner Institute and former Director of the Postgraduate Program in Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy. He is a founding member of Black Psychoanalysts Speak and serves on the boards of the Holmes Commission of the American Psychoanalytic Association, the International Psychotherapy Institute {IPI} and the Harlem Family Institute and was the former Regional Director of the New Hope Guild Centers for Children’s Mental Health of Brooklyn. He is the founding Editor of the Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy and co-edited the volumes, The Psychology of Black Boys and Adolescents and has published articles on generational trauma and the school to prison pipeline. In addition, he has presented at over 130 conferences and panels and maintains a private practice in New York City.

Kimberlyn Leary began her career as a clinical psychologist working as a practitioner to improve access to diverse communities. Her early work on negotiated transactions in psychotherapy expanded to broader research on negotiation, conflict transformation, and change management. She is an associate professor of psychology at the Harvard Medical School/McLean Hospital, an associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and a lecturer in public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, where she is co-faculty director of the Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership Initiative’s Research and Curriculum Program. Leary served as an adviser to the Obama White House from 2014-2016, working with the White House Council on Women and Girls to develop the Advancing Equity initiative (which focused on improving life outcomes for women and girls of color). Leary also served on the Biden-Harris transition as a member of the Agency Review Team for the Office of National Drug Control Policy and on an IPA with the Office of Management and Budget helping to implement the Executive Order on equity. She is a Senior Vice President at the Urban Institute.


Participants who wish to receive CE credits must attend the event (each seminar meeting) in its entirety; attendance will be recorded to track each participant’s entry and exit time.

Participants with physical or sensory disabilities are encouraged to contact the CE committee members at least 2 weeks in advance of the event to plan for appropriate accommodations. Please contact us via phone or email:
Nichelle Horlacher (Department Secretary) T 212.229.5727 x3223
aller454@newschool.edu (Richelle Allen, Ph.D.)
SteeleM@newschool.edu (Miriam Steele, Ph.D.)
LittL@newschool.edu (Lisa Litt, Ph.D.)

Participants may also contact CE committee members with any concerns. You may also share concerns when you receive your evaluation form after the event.

Tickets may be refunded up to 24 hours prior to the start of the event. Please email NSSRFerencziCenter@gmail.com to cancel your ticket and request a refund.

The New School for Social Research Clinical Psychology Department is approved by the American Psychological Association, the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work, and the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners to sponsor continuing education for psychologists, licensed social workers, and licensed mental health counselors, respectively. The New School for Social Research Clinical Psychology Department maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

The Sponsors of this event report no conflicts of interest or commercial support.


Presents

The Unwelcome Child and His Death Instinct

A Five Session Seminar

Saturdays in 2021:
March 13, April 17, May 15, October 16, and November 13
12:00-3:30p (with a 30 minute break)

Virtually by Zoom
(possibility of hybrid in-person meetings TBD)

Register HERE

General Admission for all five sessions: $350
General Admission + CE credits: $450
NSSR students, NYU Postdoc students, and Analytic Candidates: Free 
(email NSSRFerencziCenter@gmail.com with your student N# to reserve a spot; limited number of seats available)

CE Credits (15 hours) available for
New York Social Workers and MHCs
APA CE credits available for Psychologists

**NOTE FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS: The New School for Social Research Clinical Psychology Department is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Please confirm with your state licensing board that APA CE credits are accepted in your state. (Approval from the New York State Board of Education to provide CE credits to licensed Psychologists in New York is pending.)

For students and practitioners of all levels

This 5 session seminar will be held over 2021. We explore different aspects and implications of the seminal paper by Sándor Ferenczi, “The Unwelcome Child and His Death Instinct,” written well before the emergence of systematic work on attachment and infancy, which advanced an extraordinary thesis: “unwelcomeness.” Unwelcomeness could arise during the prenatal or neonatal period and may become a steady part of a particular child’s early development resulting in devastating consequences. There is a chilling sentence in the paper: “The unwelcome child dies easily and willingly.” Somatic, intrapsychic, social, and intellectual processes and conditions can and will be radically affected by early intrusive neglect and abuse.

In this seminar series we explore many of the same theoretical constructs as Ferenczi did in his original article. We will look at the complexities of attachment, unwelcomeness in development, the effects of unwelcomeness as it appears in clinical circumstances, unwelcomeness which may be part of the experience of twins, adopted or replacement children and various vicissitudes in development. We consider the presence of serious trauma in children and its relation to unwelcomeness.

Tentative schedule:

March 13
Unwelcomeness in the context of attachment
Moderators: Adrienne Harris, Miriam Steele
Speakers: Adrienne Harris, Howard Steele, Miriam Steele

April 17
Unwelcomeness as a pervasive developmental dilemma and in the transference and countertransference: an aspect of replacement
Moderator: Adrienne Harris
Speakers: Arthur Fox, Susan Klebanoff, Heather Ferguson, Michael Feldman

May 15
Unwelcomeness in the context of migration, exile and the Pandemic
Moderator: Jennifer Hunter
Speakers: Adam Brown, Spyros Orfanos, Karen Mason-Jones

October 16
Unwelcomeness carrying/provoking other trauma
Moderator: Adrienne Harris
Speakers: Veronica Csillag, Romy Reading, Warren Spielberg

November 13
Conclusion: Ferenczi’s contributions, influences
Speakers: Adrienne Harris, Endre Koritar, Giselle Galdi

– – – – –

Learning Objectives
At the end of the seminar, participants will be better able to:

March 13
Identify and list the evidence of the impact of early trauma to attachment patterns.
Compile and assess the evidence and theory Ferenczi uses to look at the long term effects of failures in the parent to attach and ond with a newborn.
Use Ferenczi’s theory as a predictor of developmental outcomes from early neglect.

April 17
 –Identify somatic and behavioral expressions of Ferenczi’s death instinct in clinical practice.
Describe how the concept of unwelcomeness can be transmitted from one generation to the next.
Assess unwelcomeness when it is instilled early and replacement offers partial recognition later; and unwelcomeness when it emerges in development and replacement is negation of subjectivity.
Describe how the patient’s embodied experience of unwelcomeness may emerge between the therapist and patient.

May 15
Develop an understanding of current interventions being developed for reducing distress among adolescents and children impacted by forced displacement.
Rate and describe the effects of migration and displacement on early and emergent attachment.
Explain the state of child human rights and the intersection with contemporary psychoanalytic psychology in the context of USA and global policies.

October 16
Recognize the connections among the following concepts: primary maternal preoccupation, the dead mother complex, and the unwelcome child.
Describe and identify Ferenczi’s contribution to the study of trauma, early disruption of attachment  and psychic and somatic growth.
Describe and compare the varieties of unwelcomeness, involving class, social categories and the history of the child’s conception within the family.

November 13
Describe how the patient’s embodied experience of unwelcomeness may emerge between the therapist and patient.
Compare and contrast Ferenczi’s object relations theory of the death instinct described in The Unwelcome Child and His Death Instinct, to Freud’s metapsychological conception of the death instinct described in Beyond the Pleasure Principle. 
Compile and analyze the innovations Ferenczi made to clinical practice and to psychoanalytic technique.
Identify and describe Ferenczi’s development of the importance of countertransference and notice the links to contemporary clinical theory.


Participants who wish to receive CE credits must attend the event (each seminar meeting) in its entirety; attendance will be recorded to track each participant’s entry and exit time.

Participants with physical or sensory disabilities are encouraged to contact the CE committee members at least 2 weeks in advance of the event to plan for appropriate accommodations. Please contact us via phone or email:
Nichelle Horlacher (Department Secretary) T 212.229.5727 x3223
aller454@newschool.edu (Richelle Allen, Ph.D.)
SteeleM@newschool.edu (Miriam Steele, Ph.D.)
LittL@newschool.edu (Lisa Litt, Ph.D.)

Participants may also contact CE committee members with any concerns. You may also share concerns when you receive your evaluation form after the event.

Tickets may be refunded up to 24 hours prior to the start of the event. Please email NSSRFerencziCenter@gmail.com to cancel your ticket and request a refund.

The New School for Social Research Clinical Psychology Department is approved by the American Psychological Association, the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work, and the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners to sponsor continuing education for psychologists, licensed social workers, and licensed mental health counselors, respectively. The New School for Social Research Clinical Psychology Department maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

The Sponsors of this event report no conflicts of interest or commercial support.


Lewis Aron (1952-2019)

Written by Adrienne Harris

On Thursday, February 28, 2019, our dear colleague and friend and leader and brave man, Lewis Aron, died in New York City. It was the end we had all feared and mostly denied, as we accompanied Lew on a long and courageous voyage fighting and living with a life-threatening cancer.

There is so much to say about Lew’s life and work but I want to begin with his way of combatting and living with his illness. He was brave but most powerfully he was generous with family, friends and colleagues. He has provided an amazing lesson in how to be open and available and at the same time continue to work for health and survival.  We badly need, in our field, to be able to face difficulty, support each other as life and work patterns are put in question, and to create a climate of honesty and responsibility.

Yesterday I taught a class in which we were reading Ghent’s great paper on submission and surrender. I feel such admiration and love for Lew as he went through the health circumstance and death he had been handed. Surrender is not giving up. It is acceptance. It is opening to experience and what it will teach you.

When I think of his work life and when I read the wonderful messages of love and admiration, I am struck by the mixture of pleasure and admiration in so many reminiscences. He had a rock band. Sig. He could build and maintain a serious psychoanalytic institution. He could work in systems – local and national.  He built structures.

Our work together included the Ferenczi Conferences starting in 1991, the Sandor Ferenczi Center beginning in 2008 with Jeremy Safran and me, the Relational Perspectives Book Series, with Steve from the inception, later with me, and adding Steve Kuchuck and Eyal Rozmarin.  That series is closing in on 100 volumes.

The work we did to bring the first conference on Sandor Ferenczi to the US was motivated – dictated one might say – by Steve Mitchell.  Cannot speak for Lew but I had no idea who Ferenczi was. Steve was so amazingly good at empowering people, sending them on various errands, and so we did a conference – held in NYC – and sat in the audience, amazed at the European analysts, who in so many ways had kept the tradition and writings and work of Ferenczi alive. Judit Mészarós, André Haynal, György Hidas, Judith Dupont joined with American analysts; Stephen Mitchell, Bromberg, Shapiro, Therese Ragen, Arnold Rachman, Benjamin Wolstein, Jay Frankel, Christofer Fortune and William Brennan.

For me, it was an astonishing and life-changing introduction to Ferenczi and his work. I know Lew was technically my colleague in that venture but for me it was so new. I do think of him as also my guide into a new and amazing world. My image for that event is that it was like plate tectonics. Continents that were now far apart had once been joined. I knew my ancestors in psychoanalysis. I knew where object relations came from. Grandfather Ferenczi. Being part of that discovery with Lew was really wonderful, unexpected and surprising.  Really so much of his work life and career had that effect and involvement.

In 2009, with Jeremy Safran, Lew Aron and I inaugurated the Sandor Ferenczi Center at The New School.  Over a decade we developed programs, lectures, workshops devoted to Ferenczi’s model of interaction, elasticity of technique, trauma focused treatment and other psychoanalytic projects. We thought of this project as the site of ideals and projects at the heart of the historic mission of The New School and as a site for innovations in psychoanalysis along the lines of Ferenczi. It is shocking beyond measure that both my colleagues died within this past year. Miriam Steele has joined the center  representing The New School faculty. We have enlarged the board and we go in remembering Lew and Jeremy and working within their vision. But it has been overwhelming to absorb both these losses.  With regard to Lew, I/we are at the beginning.

There is a lot to remember and hold tight to as we register our loss of this amazing person. His career as a psychoanalytic educator, his director of institutions and so many structures: Psychoanalytic Dialogues, Div. 39, IARPP, and for over two decades, NYU Postdoc.

His career as a psychoanalytic educator, director of institutions and so many structures: Psychoanalytic Dialogues, Div 39, IARPP and others were handled with efficiency and grace. And of course there was his ability to take on so much of the continuation of Mitchell’s very premature death, through mentorship of students – local, national and international and an astonishing vocation as a teacher of psychoanalysis in a series of study groups which continued to meet right into January of this year.

Talk about playing well with others. He had fun. He was playful and funny, all the while accomplishing a stunning array of tasks, books, and creative endeavors.

We are all wishing that he could have had more time. There was more to do and more love to participate in. I think of the wonderful pleasure of Lew’s being with Galit’s children, Yali and Emma, at their bar and bat mitzvahs last summer and how much he helped with their preparation. And I know from my last visits with Lew that he was incredibly proud of how deeply his children Kiara, Raffi and Benjamin were participating in his care.

We hold him close as we say goodbye. We can only sit with such admiration and care for Galit Atlas who has held so much in these past years AND created with Lew a life of work and love.

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About the Sándor Ferenczi Center

The goals of the New School Ferenczi Center include 1) sponsoring lectures, conferences, and workshops relevant to Ferenczi’s legacy of clinical innovation, 2) promoting Ferenczi’s legacy of social and political progressivism, and 3) contributing to the ongoing vitality of psychoanalysis as a cultural, intellectual, therapeutic discipline.

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Jeremy Safran 4/23/1952 – 5/7/2018

With great sadness, we announce the passing of our founder and dear friend, Dr. Jeremy Safran. His dedicated commitment to psychoanalytic inquiry and his unflagging support for psychoanalytic scholarship is embodied by his co-founding of the Sándor Ferenczi Center. It was through his motivation and energy that we have offered, over the course of years, a steady stream of events, talks, book launches, screenings, and more. His passion for interdisciplinary community lives in this project and stands as a testimony to his hard work and unparalleled regard for the history, present, and future of relational psychoanalysis. For so many, Jeremy was a mentor and friend, a challenger, a supporter, and a provider of so many rich opportunities. May we as a community continue to provide for one another in his honor and memory an enduring dedication to the things he loved and taught.

Interview with Lewis Aron by Jeremy Safran

Please enjoy the following interview with Lewis Aron by Jeremy Safran, two of the founders of the Sándor Ferenczi Center: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2009-04869-010

LINK TO BOOK: THE LEGACY OF SÁNDOR FERENCZI (1993). EDITORS: LEWIS ARON & ADRIENNE HARRIS.

We are pleased to inform you that “The Legacy of Sándor Ferenczi: From ghost to ancestor” edited by Lewis Aron and Adrienne Harris (1993) is available for download on this website here.

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