Indirect Communication, Authority, and Proclamation as a Normative Power: Løgstrup’s Critique of Kierkegaard, by Christopher Bennett, Paul Faulkner, and Robert Stern

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here.

Christopher Bennett is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Sheffield. He is the author of What Is This Thing Called Ethics? (Routledge, 2010); and The Apology Ritual: A Philosophical Theory of Punishment (Cambridge University Press, 2008). Among his recently published essays are “The Alteration Thesis: Forgiveness as a Normative Power,” Philosophy and Public Affairs (2018); “Intrusive Intervention and Opacity Respect,” in Treatment for Crime: Philosophical Essays on Neurointerventions in Criminal Justice, ed. David Birks and Thomas Douglas (Oxford University Press, 2018); “Children, Crime and Punishment,” in The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Childhood and Children, ed. Anca Gheaus, Gideon Calder, and Jurgen De Wispelaere (Routledge, 2018); and “Invisible Punishment Is Wrong—But Why?: The Normative Basis of Criticism of Collateral Consequences of Criminal Conviction,” The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice (2017).

Paul Faulkner is Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Sheffield. He is the author of the monograph Knowledge on Trust (Oxford University Press, 2011); and he is the editor (with Thomas Simpson) of The Philosophy of Trust (Oxford University Press, 2017). His recently published essays include “Fake Barns, Fake News,” Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective (2018); “Collective Testimony and Collective Knowledge,” Ergo (2018); “Giving the Benefit of the Doubt,” International Journal of Philosophical Studies (2018); and “Is Taxation on a Par with Forced Labor?,” in Building Trust in Taxation, ed. Bruno Peeters, Hans Gribnau, and Jo Badisco (Intersentia, 2017).

Robert Stern is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Sheffield. He is the author of numerous monographs, including The Radical Demand in Løgstrup’s Ethics (Oxford University Press, 2019); Kantian Ethics: Value, Agency, and Obligation (Oxford University Press, 2015); and Understanding Moral Obligation: Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard (Cambridge University Press, 2012). He is the editor of many essay collections, the most recent of which are (with Jens Peter Brune and Micha H. Werner) Transcendental Arguments in Moral Theory (De Gruyter, 2017); (with Hans Fink) What Is Ethically Demanded? K.E. Løgstrup’s Philosophy of Moral Life (University of Notre Dame Press, 2017); and (with Gabriele Cava) Pragmatism, Kant, and Transcendental Philosophy (Routledge, 2016). His recently published essays on the history of philosophy and German idealism include, “A Gift or a Given?: On the Role of Life in Løgstrup’s Ethics,” in The Ethics of Nature and the Nature of Ethics, ed. Gary Keogh (Lexington Books, 2017); and “Hegel’s Vorbegriff to the Encyclopedia Logic and Its Context,” in The Oxford Handbook of Hegel, ed. Dean Moyar (Oxford University Press, 2017).

Christopher Bennett, Paul Faulkner, and Robert Stern, “Indirect Communication, Authority, and Proclamation as a Normative Power: Løgstrup’s Critique of Kierkegaard,” Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 40:1 (2019), pp. 147-79.

, , , ,