Tag | Kierkegaard

Indirect Communication, Authority, and Proclamation as a Normative Power: Løgstrup’s Critique of Kierkegaard, by Christopher Bennett, Paul Faulkner, and Robert Stern

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Christopher Bennett is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Sheffield. He is the author of What Is This Thing Called Ethics? (Routledge, 2010); and The Apology Ritual: A Philosophical Theory of Punishment (Cambridge University Press, 2008). Among his recently published essays are “The Alteration Thesis: Forgiveness as […]

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The Category and the Office of Proclamation, with Particular Reference to Luther and Kierkegaard, by K.E. Løgstrup

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. K.E. Løgstrup, “The Category and the Office of Proclamation, with Particular Reference to Luther and Kierkegaard,” trans. Christopher Bennett and Robert Stern, Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 40:1 (2019), pp. 183-209.

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Immortality and Despair: Situating Kierkegaard in the Texture of Modernity as a Step toward Responsive Anthropology, by Kasper Lysemose

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Kasper Lysemose is a lecturer at The University of Southern Denmark and is currently a guest researcher at the Søren Kierkegaard Research Centre at the University of Copenhagen. He has published on Blumenberg, Kant, Husserl, Cassirer, Gehlen, Heidegger, and Nancy. His most recent book chapters and articles include […]

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REVIEW—Jon Stewart’s Kierkegaard’s Relations to Hegel Reconsidered

Daniel Greenspan reviews Jon Stewart’s Kierkegaard’s Relations to Hegel Reconsidered, published by Cambridge University Press (2003). Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Daniel Greenspan, review of Kierkegaard’s Relations to Hegel Reconsidered, by Jon Steward, in “Philosophy of Dialogue,” special issue, Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26:1 (2005), pp. 228–36.

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Introduction to Special Issue 32:2, “On Kierkegaard,” by Anna Strelis

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Anna Strelis, introduction to “On Kierkegaard,” ed. Anna Strelis, special issue, Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 32:2 (2011), pp. 217–25.

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Self, Others, Goods, Final Faith: Kierkegaard Past the Continental Divide, by Edward F. Mooney

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Edward F. Mooney, “Self, Others, Goods, Final Faith: Kierkegaard Past the Continental Divide,” in “On Kierkegaard,” ed. Anna Strelis, special issue, Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 33:2 (2011), pp. 227–49.

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Kierkegaard’s Despair in An Age of Reflection, by Clare Carlisle

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Clare Carlisle, “Kierkegaard’s Despair in An Age of Reflection,” in “On Kierkegaard,” ed. Anna Strelis, special issue, Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 33:2 (2011), pp. 251–79.

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Kierkegaard’s Originality, by David D. Possen

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. David D. Possen, “Kierkegaard’s Originality,” in “On Kierkegaard,” ed. Anna Strelis, special issue, Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 33:2 (2011), pp. 281–96.

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ΕΡΩΣ and Existence, by Richard B. Purkarthofer

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Richard B. Purkarthofer, “ΕΡΩΣ and Existence,” in “On Kierkegaard,” ed. Anna Strelis, special issue, Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 33:2 (2011), pp. 297–308.

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Kierkegaard’s Forgotten History, or Who Is the “Speculative Thinker”?, by Jamie Turnbull

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Jamie Turnbull, “Kierkegaard’s Forgotten History, or Who Is the ‘Speculative Thinker’?,” in “On Kierkegaard,” ed. Anna Strelis, special issue, Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 33:2 (2011), pp. 309–43.

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