Tag | History of philosophy

Conceptual Analysis, Practical Commitment, and Ordinary Language, by Richard Eldridge

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Richard Eldridge is Charles and Harriett Cox McDowell Professor of Philosophy at Swarthmore College. He is the author of numerous books, of which the most recent are Images of History: Kant, Benjamin, Freedom, and the Human Subject (Oxford University Press, 2016) and Literature, Life, and Modernity (Columbia University […]

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Introduction to the Exchange between Abbt and Mendelssohn on the Vocation of Man, by Anne Pollok

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here.  Anne Pollok is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of South Carolina. She is the author of the monograph Facetten des Menschen: Zur Anthropologie Moses Mendelssohns (Felix Meiner, 2010). Her recent articles and essays include “Significant Formation: An Intersubjective Approach to Aesthetic Experience in Cassirer and Langer,” Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal (2016), […]

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Exchange on the Vocation of Man: The 287th Letter Concerning the Latest Literature, by Thomas Abbt and Moses Mendelssohn

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Thomas Abbt and Moses Mendelssohn, “Exchange on the Vocation of Man: The 287th Letter Concerning the Latest Literature,” trans. Anne Pollok, Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 39:1 (2018), pp. 237-61.

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Vico’s History of Philosophy, by Donald Phillip Verene

Article available through Philosophy Documentation Center, here. Donald Phillip Verene is Charles Howard Candler Professor of Metaphysics and Moral Philosophy and the Director for Vico Studies at Emory University. He has published a long list of books, the most recent of which include James Joyce and the Philosophers at Finnegans Wake (Northwestern University Press, 2016), […]

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A Micro-Intertextual Approach to Ancient Thought: The Case of the Torpedo Fish from Plato to Galen, by Valérie Cordonier

The torpedo fish (also known as the electric ray, or crampfish) is known for causing numbness to the hands of fishermen when captured in their nets. This essay reconstructs a line of discussions concerning the nature of this fish’s numbing power through a long period pre-dating our contemporary notion of electricity. By following selected mentions […]

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